Posts tagged "islam"

Words and Deeds in Malaysia

Malaysia's Prime Minister talks of tolerance in Rome but doesn't "walk the talk" back home by Natasja Sheriff In a rare meeting in July, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak and Pope Benedict XVI agreed to establish diplomatic relations between Malaysia and the Holy See. It was a historic meeting of national significance for Malaysia, which until this...

Fashion Faux Pas as Resistant Force in France

Kathryn Montalbano: NiqaBitch, a YouTube video released shortly after France's September 2010 April 2011 official ban of face-covering head apparel, provides interesting if not deceptively complex social commentary expressed via the most fundamental medium for communication possible: the body itself.  Although the video is set to what commenters call "vulgar" rap music (in...

Tunisia’s Secular-Religious Tension Heightens

Kathryn Montalbano: In post-revolution Tunisia, tensions between what have been described as secular and conservative Muslim citizens recently heightened in the capital, Tunis, foreboding one of the major difficulties the country will face in rebuilding its sovereignty.  On Tuesday, members of the Islamist Salafist movement, which has propagated its demands in several...

The Urgency and the Lunacy

A Q&A with biographer Deborah Baker, author of The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, released last month by Greywolf Press. by Ashley Baxstrom When biographer Deborah Baker came across a collection of letters at the New York Public Library, she opened a window into a particularly complex life. The letters told the...

Don’t Get Islam? Don’t Worry, There’s an App for That!

Ashley Baxstrom: Sure, you may have access to things like the Internet, where you can Google or search Wikipedia for Islam (actually, if you Google Islam the Wikipedia page is the first thing that shows up); you could study Islam in an academic setting; you could even become an expert...

Religion, Saudi Arabia’s Symbolic Resource

Stephane Lacroix writes for Foreign Policy that the same types of unrest that are taking place across the Middle East have bypassed Saudi Arabia for two reasons, one "material" and the other "symbolic."  The first is most obviously Saudi Arabia's immense oil reserves and subsequent national wealth.  The second is what Lacroix calls the...

Give Us This Day Our Daily Links

"I believe the Founding Fathers were moved around like men on a chessboard put in place at that time so the world could have America."
Nathan Schneider grills Judith Butler, at The Immanent Frame.
A new regulation outlawing the veil in France gets the entire "religious tolerance" thing wrong.
Sarah Posner at Religion Dispatches brings...

Allah’s Name

Zeinab Yusuf Saiwalla: In Muslim majority Malaysia, the government recently refused to allow the distribution of tens of thousands of bibles that were printed in the country’s main language – Bahasa Malaysia. The controversy is not new; in 2009 the Malaysian Home Ministry prosecuted The Herald, Malaysia's sole Catholic publication, and threatened it with the...

Listening, with Monks

Abby Ohlheiser: Of Gods and Men (122 minutes, 2010), a new film by Xavier Beauvois, opened last Friday in Los Angeles and New York (at Sunshine, show times are here) after a brief run at the New York Film Festival in the fall. Winner of the second-place prize at last year's...

Christmas Island: Refugee Politics and an Orphan

by Nasya Bahfen It was not nearly as dramatic as the footage beamed around the world of thousands of jubilant Egyptians celebrating in Tahrir Square, but the image of nine year old Seena Akhlaqi Sheikhdost caused a quiet revolution in Australia this week. Last December, the flimsy boat carrying Seena and up to a hundred Iranian,...

Seeing God in Tahrir: Ethics of the Revolution

by Yasmin Moll Many commentators both inside and outside Egypt have focused on the anticipated role of the Muslim Brotherhood in a post-Mubarak Egypt. In many of these analyses, the Brotherhood is used as a metonym for the projected role of Islam in the public sphere. However, while the Brotherhood will certainly play a formative role...

Women’s Rights in Egypt

"The Mubarak regime is more dangerous to women than the Muslim Brotherhood." Listen to renown feminist Dr. Nawal El Saadawi and NYU graduate student Yasmin Moll on the Brian Lehrer show on NPR. You can read today's exclusive article by El Saadawi at Women's Media Center here.