Posts tagged "DEADLINE THEOLOGY"

Relapsed Catholic

The Revealer is still sick. Check back tomorrow, please; and in the meantime, visit our friend Kathy Shaidle at Relapsed Catholic. Kathy was one of the first religion bloggers, and she’s always maintained a sharp eye for the telling, the absurd. Lately she’s taken a turn to the right, but ideology hasn’t blunted her perception. It does raise an...

Fever

The Revealer has a fever today, so high I’ve been haunted by fever dreams of George W. Bush leading an orange-robed choir in my living room. I won’t try to parse that, nor anything in the wide world of online religion. Instead, today’s offering will be a selection of simple links to items The Revealer finds intriguing, if not necessarily...

Priesthood of the Press

From Jay Rosen‘s “Journalism is Itself a Religion” — a new Revealer feature: What results from the “relative godlessness of mainstream journalists?” Or, in a more practical vein: How are editors and reporters striving to improve or beef up their religion coverage? Here and there in the discussion of religion “in” the news, there arises a trickier matter, which is the religion of the newsroom,...

The Celibate Elephant

The Revealer welcomes guest commentator Peter Manseau, co-author of Killing the Buddha: A Heretic’s Bible and author of the forthcoming Vows: A Family History of Sex, Love, and the Catholic Church. The Big Catholic Story of the week was the church-funded and church-coordinated audit of church compliance with the church’s plan for preventing sexual abuse by church workers. If...

Ultimate Concerns

Nicholas Kristof is at it again. Sometime in the last couple of years, The New York Times columnist found God. Not in the sense of getting religion, but as — stop the presses! — the biggest story of the year. It started with a column noting that while newsrooms tend to be indifferent toward religion, many people on...

Good Intentions

Buried in the Christmas edition of The New York Times was a story that might be characterized as the religion reporter’s version of the “last man in town who can whittle worth a damn” genre: “Commune to Close, After Years of Strife and Striving.” As a representative of the category, Sarah Kershaw‘s report isn’t bad; Kershaw tells the...

Open and Closed

“Only nine people are in church tonight, and all but two of us have come alone. As we sing ‘Come Ye Faithful, Raise the Anthem,’ our voices are tiny in all the air; when we share the Peace, our heels click-clack loudly as we find one another in the half-light. I sit in my long,...

Civil War?

Albany; Pittsburgh; San Joaquin; South Carolina; Florida, Central Florida, and Southwest Florida; Dallas and Fort Worth; Quincy and Springfield in Illinois; Western Kansas; and Rio Grande. Religion writers in or near any of these areas have a lot of work on their hands, as the Episcopalian bishop of each of these dioceses has joined the...

“Like Moby-Dick Without the Whale”

Such is any attempt to talk about the whole of American history without talking about Jonathan Edwards, according to historian George Marsden, author of a one of The Revealer‘s favorite books of 2003, a biography on the 18th-century theologian most famous for his “sinners in the hands of an angry God” sermon. Marsden is quoted in a U.S. News and World...

Hellmouth

Just after the war in Bosnia, a priest showed Rose Marie Berger a cross erected on a hillside. One side depicted a resurrection Jesus, offering the promise of life and joy; the other revealed an angry Christ of eternal judgment. Berger preferred the good-times Jesus, but the locals, who had seen 1,500 of their own massacred, opted for...

The Oozing Church

“A few years back,” writes Alan Rifkin in The Los Angeles Times Magazine, “a mentally ill man wandered on the campus [of Fuller Theological Seminary] from the streets of Pasadena, touching off an interdisciplinary turf war that sounds like legend but is fact. The School of Psychology wanted to arrange for professional counseling; two faculty in the School of...

God’s Gay Marriage

When The New York Times delivers a sermon, it’s usually of the secular variety, which is why it comes as a surprise to open the paper today to an explicitly religious column by David Brooks, better known for his smart-aleck condemnations of “Bobos.” “Anybody who has several sexual partners in a year is committing spiritual suicide,” Brooks begins his...