Reviews
Love, Magic and Holy Death

Love, Magic and Holy Death

David Metcalfe talks to R. Andrew Chestnut about his latest, Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, The Skeleton Saint; with an excerpt from the book.
Famous Drownings in Literary History

Famous Drownings in Literary History

An excerpt from a new book by Kevin Haworth, Famous Drownings in Literary History: Essays on 21st Century Jewishness.
Divine Intervention: American Faith in Foreign Policy

Divine Intervention: American Faith in Foreign Policy

Gale Kenny reviews Andrew Preston's new book, "Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith: Religion in American War and Diplomacy," a narrative history of foreign policy and piety in America.
Unfit for Heaven and Earth

Unfit for Heaven and Earth

By Ed Simon A review of Afterlives of Saints, in which author Colin Dickey examines that borderland where saints and sinners alone exist, oftentimes within the same person.

Man Without a Country: “The Myth of the Muslim Tide”

by Nora Connor His sociology is methodical, clear and convincing, but he’s bringing a slide-rule and a pocket protector to a gunfight.
Religion-Secular, Tangled Divisions

Religion-Secular, Tangled Divisions

What does it mean to pursue, inhabit, or lead a valuable, ethical life in a secular age? Are we living in a post-secular world? A review of two new essay collections.
Saint George, the Monstrous Saint

Saint George, the Monstrous Saint

An excerpt from Afterlives of the Saints: Stories from the Ends of Faith (Unbridled Books, 228 pp.) by Colin Dickey. Much of the actual life of George is lost to history, if he was in fact a real person.

Let’s Get Radical: a review of The Light In Her Eyes

by Rachel Riederer It’s difficult for me to conceive of the memorization of scripture as even a mildly progressive act, let alone a radical one. But The Light in Her Eyes...sets out to prove that it is.
Missed Opportunities: a review of "Arab Media"

Missed Opportunities: a review of “Arab Media”

by Narges Bajoghli It's true that mass media have been used (and still are, in some contexts) as a means of social engineering...Nonetheless, it's imperative to remember that the state cannot control how people interpret what they see.

More Tea, Vicar? A review of BBC’s “Rev”

by Abhimanyu Das The Church of England inhabits a unique place in this busy trafficking of religious stereotypes. They're the Church that's known for being, well, not that religious.

Cooking the Books: A Review of “The Revisionaries”

By Nathan Schradle The Revisionaries, a documentary about the Texas State Board of Education, debuted at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival.
Inventing My Religion

Inventing My Religion

By Fred Folmer Shortly after finishing Invented Religions: Imagination, Fiction and Faith (Ashgate, 2010), a recent book by religious studies scholar Carole M. Cusack, I tried a quick experiment.