From AP via HuffPoUSAToday:

In Beijing, Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang at a regular news conference Tuesday remarked about the date: “I only remember two dates: March 8, 1951 and May 23, 1959, the liberation of the Tibetan serfs.”

From AP via FoxNews:

Dhakal said the exiles will, however, be allowed to celebrate the Dalai Lama’s birthday inside monasteries and refugee camps so long as the facilities do not contain slogans or banners protesting against China.

From Times of India:

Fearing a major diplomatic embarrassment, Nepal’s foreign ministry asked all the 601 members of parliament not to accept invitations by the Tibetan community to attend the birthday celebrations.

The cautionary measure came after three MPs ruffled Beijing last month by visiting Dharamshala, the seat of the Dalai Lama’s “government in exile” in India, and meeting him.

China regarded it as a violation of Nepal’s “One China” policy that regards Tibet to be an integral part of China.

From Voice of America:

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang refused to comment on the Dalai Lama’s birthday celebrations.

From The Washington Post:

But Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said he was not keeping track of the Dalai Lama’s age, and suggested people devote themselves to remembering other landmarks.

From AsiaNews:

Despite these positive elements, the Chinese government has not allowed Tibetans to celebrate the birthday. Tibetans cannot wish the Dalai Lama long life or burn incense for him in accordance with their tradition. Even showing his picture could land people in jail.

From Phayul:

The government issued a directive to members of the Constituent Assembly, asking them not to participate in birthday celebrations, the Himalayan Times reported.

The Foreign Ministry also called on all parties to make sure none of their members participated.

Nepal stepped up security in the capital, as well as on the northern border adjoining Tibet